The Significance of English Scientific Writing Proficiency for Publishing Purposes: The Case of Moroccan EFL PhD Students at the Euromed University of Fes

Authors

  • Bachiri Housseine Faculty of Sciences and Technologies, Tangier, Abdelmalek Essaâdi University, Morocco
  • Tribak Oifaa Faculty of Sciences, Meknes, Moulay Ismail University, Morocco

Keywords:

Scientific writing, Indexed journals, writing across the curriculum, academic research, recommendations

Abstract

This study aspires to theoretically and empirically investigate the dearth of English scientific writing in the engineering PhD programs at the Euromed University of Fes. It must be noted that the entire absence of English in the curriculum of PhD programs unequivocally creates myriad challenges, mainly in the writing process. Doctoral students find themselves impotent to publish in indexed journals, be it a single-blind peer review or a double-blind peer review, due to the high demands of scientific writing proficiency and accuracy alongside the scrupulous treatment of data. In like manner, novice researchers lack expertise and oftentimes agonize about the writing task as their meta-cognitive skills need to be rejuvenated, revitalized, and rigorously fortified. To that end, the use of numerical data by means of questionnaire is highly estimated by researchers to vigorously help in unveiling the aforementioned challenges, while simultaneously systematically paving the way for context-specific recommendations to be made in order to alleviate some of the pressure that doctoral students undergo with respect to English scientific writing for the purpose of producing quality publishable materials.

Author Biographies

Bachiri Housseine , Faculty of Sciences and Technologies, Tangier, Abdelmalek Essaâdi University, Morocco

Bachiri Housseine is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Sciences and Technologies in Tangier. He earned his PhD in Applied Linguistics and Education in 2017. He has been teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL) for several years. His research interests are language teaching, pedagogy, ICTs, and curriculum design. He enjoys writing and collaborating with other researchers and scholars on topics pertinent to Linguistics and Applied Linguistics.

Tribak Oifaa, Faculty of Sciences, Meknes, Moulay Ismail University, Morocco

Tribak Oifaa is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Sciences. She teaches English for Specific Purposes (ESP) in different institutions in Morocco. Her main areas of interest are gender, discourse analysis, ICT, and language teaching.

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Published

2020-09-15

How to Cite

Housseine , B., & Oifaa, T. (2020). The Significance of English Scientific Writing Proficiency for Publishing Purposes: The Case of Moroccan EFL PhD Students at the Euromed University of Fes . Linguistic Forum - A Journal of Linguistics, 2(3), 15-23. Retrieved from http://linguisticforum.com/index.php/ling/article/view/52